Let's Discuss the Pkmn TCG with Prof. Kamak: Revival!

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Kamak
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Let's Discuss the Pkmn TCG with Prof. Kamak: Revival!

Post by Kamak »

So, as some of you may or may not have known, I've been an official Pokemon Professor since September, but unfortunately, I haven't been able to do much with it (either have been competing, or busy to oversee tournaments, and I'm trying to get a league started locally).

So, I figured, I can use my knowledge to help people get into the Pokemon TCG, which has been seeing a lot more activity in the past couple of years.

Whether you're new to the game, are currently playing, or played back in the day and don't know what all of these wacky looking things like Ace Specs and Supporters are doing in your card game, feel free to check in.

I will be updating this thread periodically with general rules, different types of play, tournament guides, a breakdown of what you need to go national, and how to build a deck around your favorite cards, along with deck ideas for the more competitively minded.

So, if you have any questions about the game, I will be pop flyin' to help.

Lessons:

Lesson 1: The Basics

Lesson 2: Anatomy of a Pokemon Card

Lesson 3: General Rules for Turns

Lesson 4: Play Area Etiquette

Lesson 5: Card Etiquette and Statuses

Lesson 6: Setup and Play


Deckbuilding 101:

1: Deck Strategy

2: Bare Bones and Skeletons

3: Playtesting and Teching


History of Pokemon:

The Early Years

Prepare For Trouble, Then Make it Double

It's a Whole New World

All that Glitters is not Gold and Silver

Endings but also Beginnings

Reports:

Texas State Report

Announcements:

PTCGO Draft Tournament

Plasma Freeze Pre-release

Guest Lectures:

Liraxus's Report: Who is Imakuni?
Last edited by Kamak on Tue May 23, 2017 7:52 am, edited 15 times in total.
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Re: Let's Discuss the Pokemon TCG with Prof. Kamak

Post by Tetrunes »

How do you expect to call yourself a professor when Kamak isn't a tree?
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Re: Let's Discuss the Cockfighting Society TCG with Prof. Ka

Post by Kamak »

You're banned from the Pokemon league.

Between me and my friends, we've joked that I should call myself Professor Beech, but since I'm trying to start a league that will probably have children in it, I probably need a better name than that.

I was thinking of Tamarix, since I go by Tam most places anyways, but it sounds more like a Kingdom Hearts OC than a professor.
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Re: Let's Discuss the Cockfighting Society TCG with Prof. Ka

Post by Rinoko »

I AM A BOY.

MY NAME IS MARCATO.

MY RIVAL'S NAME IS BUTTMUNCH.

NOW GIVE ME MY BULBASAUR.
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Re: Let's Discuss the Cockfighting Society TCG with Prof. Ka

Post by Blitz Walrus »

Aw Yuss, Shit's still fun after 20 years. What decks do you guys main?
Recently combined my two fave decks, a Steel/Electric one and a Dark/Fighting into this ridiculous Steel/Dark/Fighting clusterfuck.
Tyranitar/Aggron tag team son!
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Re: Let's Discuss the Cockfighting Society TCG with Prof. Ka

Post by TheStranger »

I never played the game, I just collected the cards. Unless you count the GBC game, which was pretty fun.
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Re: Let's Discuss the Cockfighting Society TCG with Prof. Ka

Post by Kamak »

Marcato wrote:I AM A BOY.

MY NAME IS MARCATO.

MY RIVAL'S NAME IS BUTTMUNCH.

NOW GIVE ME MY BULBASAUR.
You get a grass deck. Time to trade your way to victory.
Blitz Walrus wrote:Aw Yuss, Shit's still fun after 20 years. What decks do you guys main?
Recently combined my two fave decks, a Steel/Electric one and a Dark/Fighting into this ridiculous Steel/Dark/Fighting clusterfuck.
Tyranitar/Aggron tag team son!
I've been playing with 3 decks recently.

I'm modifying my Rise From The Ashes (Ho-oh) deck with some new cards for better consistency, I've been working on a pretty vanilla Zekeels deck for battling against (I don't really like the playstyle or the fact that it's really prevalent in the meta), and I'm currently building my new favorite, my Cobalion Klinklang deck.

I also have my very fun Enrai deck, but it doesn't really do much right now.
TheStranger wrote:I never played the game, I just collected the cards. Unless you count the GBC game, which was pretty fun.
Well, not too much has changed from the GBC game (besides the cards of course), so you know at least what generally happens in the game.

Anyways, here's the first lesson (there is an online tutorial for the TCG on the website that takes you through the major things. It's pretty good, but it's basic, and it's really geared towards kids which can be a turn off to older people that don't want a Dora the Explorer hand holding going on):

Lesson 1: The Basics



In the Pokemon TCG, you have a deck constructed of 60 cards to fight against your opponent. Before we get into the details of how to play, let's dissect the components of a deck. There are 3 general categories of cards, as follows:

1. Pokemon Cards:

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The cornerstone of any deck. Pokemon cards are pretty much the only required type of card in a deck (though I can guarantee almost any deck will fail without the other two in them). There are many kinds of Pokemon cards that you can put in your deck. For just a taste of the kinds of Pokemon cards out there, and what they do here's some summaries:

Basic Pokemon: The most playable Pokemon in the game. These are the first unevolved forms of Pokemon. Bulbasaur, Zangoose, and even Mewtwo are basic Pokemon (though some basics get a different distinction in the game, as we'll see in a different lesson. Because they're basic and easy to play, they're often weaker than evolved Pokemon. The tradeoff though is that basics often help set up your deck, so they can be very valuable in the early part of the game.

Stage 1 Pokemon: These Pokemon are the final or intermediate forms of Pokemon lines. Charmeleon, Linoone, and Raichu are Stage 1 Pokemon (again there can be exceptions, but we'll ignore that for now). These are usually bulkier than basic Pokemon, but if they're in intermediate form (like Charmeleon), they're still not the most powerful they can be. They cannot be immediately played on the battlefield, but rather have to be evolved from a corresponding Pokemon that it evolves from (Charmeleon can only be evolved from Charmander). In this way, they're a bit limited, but their power can make up for the trade off of not being available early on.

Stage 2 Pokemon: These Pokemon are the definitive final forms of Pokemon lines. Blastoise, Togekiss, and Metagross are Stage 2 Pokemon. These are often the most bulky and powerful Pokemon in the game, but like stage 1's, they cannot be played until they're evolved from their previous forms. In many cases, they often don't get out until much later in the game than any other type of card due to the time needed to evolve the Pokemon.They can require a big investment in your deck to use, but they're often the best Pokemon you can find to fight with.

Baby Pokemon: These pokemon are pre-evolutions of Basic Pokemon. Pichu, Mime Jr. and Magby are baby Pokemon, but Togepi, Riolu, and other pokemon that would seem like they'd be baby Pokemon aren't. Baby Pokemon are among the weakest in the game, but often have special abilities that make them useful. Depending on the baby Pokemon, they may or may not be able to evolve into their basic Pokemon counterparts. Even if they can, their basic forms can be played without needing to evolve the baby. Baby Pokemon can be immediately placed on the field, but their frailty makes them a bit of a gamble.

There are also special kinds of Pokemon, including Light, Dark, Trainer, Shining, Crystal, ex, Delta, Lv. X, Legend, and EX. Those will be the focus of later entries, but keep in mind, they usually follow the same conventions of regular cards in terms of playability and evolution.

Now, these kinds of cards are divided into 10 types of Pokemon cards (which might confuse fans of the games, as multiple game types are wrapped together into the tcg). Each type falls into a general category of play and has it's own color and symbol, as follows:

Image Colorless: The equivalent of Normal Pokemon (also encompasses Flying types and used to have Dragon Pokemon). These Pokemon fit into almost any deck usually and are often more attack oriented than special effects. Some Colorless Pokemon can be particularly nasty, but they're often taken care of by Fighting or Electric (if they're flyers) types.

Image Grass: The equivalent of Grass Pokemon (also contains Bug and some poison types). These Pokemon are more defensive, and often use status effects to make up for their lack of sheer power. The best way to counter these Pokemon is to use Fire or Psychic Pokemon, but Fighting and Water types can have a hard time against them.

Image Fire: The equivalent of Fire types (and that's pretty much it). These Pokemon are pretty strong and benefited by their ability to burn Pokemon. Their HP isn't great, and their weakness to Water Pokemon doesn't help, but they decimate Grass types.

Image Water: The equivalent of Water types (and Ice). These Pokemon hit a balance between power, speed, and defense. They usually are easier to play than the other types, but the fact that they're pretty average often hurts them when you need a little bit more of something. Lightning and Grass Pokemon have a field day with them, but they can take care of Fire and some Fighting Pokemon.

Image Lightning: The equivalent of Electric types. These Pokemon are all about speed, and often sacrifice HP because of this. However, with paralysis, the ability to negate attacks, and pretty good attack power, they can easily overwhelm slower decks that can't keep up. They're totaled by Fighting Pokemon, but do great against Water and certain Colorless Pokemon.

Image Fighting: The equivalent of Fighting types (also taking care of Rock and Ground types). These Pokemon are slow but power and defense oriented. You won't often see tricky effects on these Pokemon, but that's fine as they tear through Electric, Normal, and Dark types. They're in turn bogged down by Psychics, and some have issues with Water and Grass Pokemon.

Image Psychic: The equivalent of Psychic types (including Ghost and some Poison Pokemon). These Pokemon usually have below average HP, but are full of tricks, and sometimes don't even directly attack. They're hard to exploit weakness-wise, as they're often weak only to themselves.

Image Darkness: The equivalent of Dark types. These Pokemon often have average speed and HP, but they focus on disrupting the opponent more than directly harming their Pokemon. They can be a bit of a gamble to play, but most decks aren't prepared for their presence. They resist Psychics but are terrible against Fighting types.

Image Metal: The equivalent of Steel types. These Pokemon have the bulkiest HP, but they're extremely slow and often not very powerful. They will wall almost any deck that doesn't have Fire types in them, and they're great against ice-minded Water types.

Image Dragon: The equivalent of Dragon types. A recent addition to the game, Dragons are a mix of the above types, a lot like the Colorless Pokemon they used to be. Dragons are only weak to themselves, and their variability makes them able to find a place in many places.

Well, that's a lot of information on Pokemon cards, and it's easy to see how important they are to the game. They're often the baseline foundation of what makes a deck strategy. However, they can't do it alone, which leads us to the second kind of card in the game:

2. Trainer Cards:

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Trainer cards are there to help your deck be better. Whether it searches out specific Pokemon, gives you cards to draw, or messes up your opponent at a critical time, they're good at making your deck stronger. While these are the least essential of the big 3 types of cards in your deck, most decks run anywhere from 20-40 trainers in their decks. Like Pokemon cards, there's a few categories of trainer cards to consider, with a few rules that apply to them.

Item Cards: The most plentiful and the original type of trainer cards. You can play as many item cards as you want in a turn, provided you can use their effect. Whether you're looking for that Pikachu stuck in your deck, healing your Pokemon after a big attack, or pulling cards out of your discard, items are often the most important cards to use throughout the game.

Tool Cards: A subset of item cards, these cards get placed on Pokemon to "hold". Their effects vary, from making your Pokemon's attacks hit harder, to making them get out of battle easier. Not all decks run tool cards, but they can sometimes make or break a deck.

Supporter Cards: These emerged later into the card game when they realized sometimes limits needed to be placed on the playability of some trainer cards. Supporters are very powerful trainers, but are limited by the fact that you can normally only play 1 supporter per turn. Some have drawbacks like discarding cards, but they can help you get more cards in your hand or getting the specific ones you need. Getting the right supporter at the right time can be a challenge though, and choosing which to use in a turn can be a game-making decision.

Stadium Cards: These are some of the least plentiful trainer cards, and not all decks run with them, but their effects of extra HP, lower retreat, or status buffs can be a godsend. Stadiums stay in effect until they get discarded by another Stadium being played. Players have to be careful though, as Stadiums can be used by not only themselves, but also their opponents.

So Trainer cards help get your deck going, but the raw power of the deck is controlled by the last kind of card in a deck. You won't get anywhere without these cards, but how many of them is enough can often be a headache for experienced players. So here's the final kind of card in the game:

3. Energy Cards:

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These are what power up your Pokemon. In a sense, their their strength and what limits them and balances the game. Pokemon need certain energy to attack, and this need limits how many types of Pokemon you can put in a deck (as you might not draw the right energy if you're picking through more types. There are 2 categories of Energy cards:

Basic Energy Cards: These are the only cards that you can have as many copies of in a deck as you want. Want 20 fire energies? Fine. Want 6 Fighting and 6 Lightning? Sure. Want one of each? Awesome. There is a basic Energy type for every Pokemon except Dragon (which uses different basics) and Colorless (which is a catch-all for any type of energy, as will be explained later). They don't have special effects and are straight forward cards.

Special Energy Cards: These cards, unlike Basic Energies, are limited in how many you can have in a deck, but they're often powerful, covering 1 or more types, adding effects to your Pokemon, or offering multiple energies at once. They're harder to get out on the field since they often can't be pulled out of a deck or discard, but they can make your decks better.

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Understanding these basics helps in making a good, balanced deck, and can help you figure out what your opponent might be up to. If anyone if offput by the length of this lesson, I hope that future ones will be a bit less daunting. I hope this has helped people get their foot in the door of the card game, and if you have any questions about the above lesson, please ask.

pop flyin' Gaming.

-Professor Kamak
Last edited by Kamak on Sat Feb 23, 2013 10:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Let's Discuss the Cockfighting Society TCG with Prof. Ka

Post by Blitz Walrus »

Anyway we can play online?
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Re: Let's Discuss the Cockfighting Society TCG with Prof. Ka

Post by D-vid »

That would be pretty bitchin'. I learned how to play from the gameboy game but never fought against anyone since I didn't know anybody who knew how to play.
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Re: Let's Discuss the Cockfighting Society TCG with Prof. Ka

Post by Kamak »

Blitz Walrus wrote:Anyway we can play online?
Yes, there's the official online version of the game that has the current cards and allows you to play a mock league of NPCs or compete online, but you need code cards for online booster packs, so it would cost cheddar to get into (you can buy code cards for as cheap as a quarter apiece online from websites).

There's also PlayTCG (you build a deck and register at bebe's search which is used by competitive players to playtest decks before they invest in the cards. I think they're limited to the cards in format right now (so Base Set - Call of Legends wouldn't be available). You have to find an opponent yourself and do all of the actions the cards ask for manually, and sometimes it's not designed for card effects.

For all of the cards, I think Redshark might still be around, but I think they're defunct as of Emerging Powers.

Otherwise, there's always Skype for real play using webcams, but sometimes that gets annoying to figure out.

Out of these, PlayTCG is probably the best option, even if it limits you to the newest cards. The shuffling randomizer can be a bit dodgy though.

Since I want to get plenty of updates out quickly, this post will probably be edited with the second lesson soon, over how to read the information of a Pokemon card.

Lesson 2: Anatomy of a Pokemon Card



Much like learning a language, it's important to be able to know how to read and comprehend the information being given to you. There's a lot of information packed onto these cards, and it's easy to overlook some vital things that you need to keep in mind when building a deck. I've taken the liberty of breaking down a Pokemon card you've already seen in this thread to show you what you can find:

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Now that you know what those things are, what the heck do they mean?

Card Name

The name of the card. This is important because you cannot have more than 4 copies of a card with the same name. This means if you built a deck with Venusaur, you cannot have more than 4 of them, even if they're different cards. For instance, if you had 4 of the above Venusaur in your deck, you could not have this card:

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However, you could have 2 and 2, 3 and 1, or any combination you want.

There are cards with similar names though. For instance:

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Since this card is called "Erika's Venusaur" it's technically not "Venusaur" so you can have 4 of each in your deck. Keep in mind though, in some of these cards with name variants, they evolve from the same base card ("Dark Venusaur" evolves from "Bulbasaur"), so if you have 4 Venusaur and 4 Dark Venusaur, you only have 4 Bulbasaur to get them. The implications of this will be discussed later.

So Pokemon names matter a lot in deck building.

Health Points

Just like in the games, Pokemon have Health Points, or Hit Points, or HP, or however you want to refer to them. The amount of HP for a Pokemon is displayed in the top corner. A Pokemon faints if it has 0 or fewer HP, at which point it's taken off the field. It's up to both players to keep track of how much HP a Pokemon has left, but that's a matter for later.

As a general trend, evolved Pokemon have more HP than their pre-evolved forms.

Type

The Pokemon's type is shown next to the Pokemon's HP and indicated by the card's color. Everything the Pokemon does is dictated by that type (If Venusaur attacks a Pokemon weak to grass attacks with Poison Powder, it takes double damage, even though you'd assume that poison powder might be a different type attack than grass). Some Pokemon can change their type, but in the case of the majority, this symbol is the go to for card effects and attacks.

Card Type

In the top left corner is the card type, which tells you if the Pokemon is a Basic, Stage 1, Stage 2, or Baby Pokemon. If it is anything but a basic, it will also have a circle and text that tells you how to evolve the Pokemon (in the above example, you need to put the Venusaur card on an Ivysaur). Note that like card names, the name of the other evolutions is strictly what you have to have to evolve to that Pokemon. To illustrate:

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Notice how it says "Evolve from Erika's Ivysaur". This means that Erika's Venusaur MUST be evolved from Erika's Ivysaur, not a regular Ivysaur like the example Venusaur. Similarly, the example Venusaur cannot evolve from Erika's Ivysaur, even though it has Ivysaur in the name. It has to match exactly to work.

Now we get to the meat of the card, what makes it playable:

Ability

Cards have various names for these things. They used to be Poke-powers, then they got split into Poke-bodies, and now they're referred to as Abilities. For now, we'll focus on what it means as an ability (the differences for the past names will be discussed at a later time). Abilities are powers that can be potentially activated at various times, according to the text. In Venusaur's case, you can use it once a turn to get a Pokemon card out of the deck. If you had multiple Venusaurs on the field, you could use the Ability once per Venusaur each turn. Other abilities are active at all times, or only when you first play the card. They often help and can even be used from the bench without ending the turn, unlike the next category.

Attack

Pokemon have usually 1, 2, or sometimes 3 attacks to choose from. Venusaur only has one, Poison Powder.

The symbols to the left of the attack are the energy requirements. As you can see, it requires 4 energies to use that attack, 2 of which have to be Grass Energies. The other two energies are colorless, so any type of energy can satisfy those.

To the right of the attack is the number "70". That's how many hit points the attack takes away from the opponent, disregarding any effects. We'll talk a bit later about what could effect this number. In addition, if the attack has a symbol next to it (like a + - or x), the number will be altered, usually by some kind of text below the attack.

Under the attack name, there is additional text. Sometimes this is added effects, like poisoning in the case of Poison Powder, but also you could be asked to attach or get rid of energies, flip coins, or told that the attack may do nothing if some requirement isn't met. Not all attacks have additional text, so the attack is straightforward.

Weakness

Weakness is the Pokemon card's kryptonite, in a sense. In this example, Venusaur is weak to Fire type Pokemon, so they will do double damage to Venusaur when they use attacks. It's best to keep your Pokemon out of harm's way if they're at a type disadvantage, though that's not always possible. Not all Pokemon have weaknesses.

Resistance

Resistance is the Pokemon card's ability to withstand a certain type of card. For Venusaur, you can see that it takes 20 less damage from Water type Pokemon. If you were facing a Water Pokemon, it might be a good idea to send Venusaur out against it. Keep in mind, resistance doesn't mean your Pokemon will be effective against them, only that they're LESS effective against you. Just like weakness, not all Pokemon have resistance.

Retreat

So you have Venusaur out on the field and the opponent sends out a Fire type. Crap! How do you get out of this? You need to retreat. Ignoring outside effects, the retreat cost is used to tell you how many energies you need to discard in order to retreat Venusaur out of there. Venusaur has a hefty 4 retreat cost, meaning you have to get rid of 4 energies to move it out of there. Generally, more evolved Pokemon have higher retreat costs, but there are always exceptions. Some Pokemon have no retreat cost, meaning they can retreat without giving up anything.

Now, all that's left is a little bit of information to identify the Pokemon cards:

Set Symbol

This symbol lets you know what set the card came from. In this case, Venusaur is from the Black and White: Dark Explorers expansion. Set Symbols are important for looking up cards effectively, and in official tournaments, you're often required to make a deck list that includes this information. It's important to be able to know what sets your cards are from using these symbols.

For a reference of the set symbols, look here. Note that Base Set had no set symbol, and First Edition symbols are different than set symbols. The Set Symbol isn't always in the same place, as it's shifted as the cards have changed over the years.

Card Rarity

Card Rarity refers to how rare a Pokemon card is within its set. The following symbols are the most common:

Image: Common. These cards come 5 in a booster pack currently.

Image: Uncommon. These cards come 3 in a booster pack currently.

Image: Rare. This symbol is used for Rare, Holofoil, and Ultra Rare cards in many cases. Sometimes it is foil colored instead of black to denote "higher" rarity. These cards come 1 in a booster pack currently.

This symbol denotes the general rarity of a card, but isn't a good benchmark on how useful or valuable a card is.

Card Number

This number tells you where the card lies in the card order. It's an index of sort to find cards easily. Before Black and White, Pokemon cards were organized by alphabetical order and by rarity (Holofoils, Rares, Uncommons, Commons, Rare Trainers, Uncommon Trainers, Common Trainers, Energy, Ultra Rares, Secret Rares), but are now organized by type and Pokedex number (Grass, Fire, Water, Lightning, Psychic, Fighting, Darkness, Metal, Dragon, Colorless, Trainers, Ultra Rares, Secret Rares), just like Japan.

These numbers are the same for every Pokemon card. Every Venusaur card like this will be 3/108.

This information helps keep you from getting fake cards, and keep you from using the wrong cards in tournaments with strict rules over which cards are allowed.

----------

All of this information is essential to understanding everything about a Pokemon card. It's quite a bit to take in, but once you get the hang of it, it's easy to become "fluent" in reading and comprehending what the cards are telling you.

And understanding the cards are essential to playing a fair game without making bonehead mistakes.

pop flyin' Gaming.

-Professor Kamak
Last edited by Kamak on Sat Feb 23, 2013 10:50 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Let's Discuss the Cockfighting Society TCG with Prof. Ka

Post by D-vid »

Professor I knew all that already. I want my Pokemoooooon.
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Re: Let's Discuss the Cockfighting Society TCG with Prof. Ka

Post by Kamak »

Shush, grandson. You get your Pokemon after your rival picks theirs.

That way you have a type advantage.

Don't fuck up our careful planning now with your carelessness. Do you want to be like Bianca?

Time for a bit of a short lesson, though still very important:

Lesson 3: General Rules for turns



God, I'm reminded of how much I hated Birch's Lab theme. Good thing his Route/introduction theme rocks balls.

So we know what the general kinds of cards are in the game, and we know how to read the more complex Pokemon cards out there (for Trainer cards, they will tell you which type they are, and unless the energy says it's Special, it's a basic energy), time to set some basic rules for what you can do during your turn. We also need to talk about set up eventually, but for now, focusing on options is important.

Turns always begin with drawing a card. At that point, you can do the following:

Use a Pokemon Ability

Some Pokemon have abilities that can activate during a turn. You can use them at this point. Keep in mind, some abilities can end a turn if you use them. If you want to get other actions in, you should wait to use the ability until you're done.

Use a Supporter Card

Maybe you have a supporter that would help out. You can play one now, though keep in mind, you can only play 1 Supporter per turn. You may want to take other actions before this, as you might get a better supporter with the use of different cards. In addition, it's important to pick and choose which turns to use Supporters in. Just because you have it, doesn't mean you have to play it. Also, some supporters have drawbacks:

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Professor Juniper is a great Pokemon card, but if you have a lot of cards in your hand, it's not a good idea to use it. You might want to either use those other cards first to minimize the cards discarded, or hold off for a smaller hand. Also, any cards discarded are much harder to get back than cards that are waiting around in your deck.

Play item cards

You can play as many item or tool cards as you want, but be sure it's beneficial to do so. Cards like Ultra Ball:

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require you discard 2 cards to use, so while you get a Pokemon out of it, picking which cards to throw in the discard can be hard, or even if you have plenty of cards to throw out, using multiple Ultra Balls can drain your hand of cards, making your options weaker. These are things to consider when you play.

Play a Stadium Card

This doesn't often come up, but picking the right timing to play a Stadium card is important, especially if you think your opponent is going to get rid of it or benefit from it more than you.

Play Basic Pokemon

Assuming you don't have a full bench (more on that later), you can play basic Pokemon from your hand to the field.

Evolve Pokemon

You can evolve Pokemon if you have the right card to evolve a Pokemon that is on a bench. Keep in mind, you cannot evolve a Pokemon you put down in that same turn, or that has evolved already that turn. For example, if you played a Squirtle on turn 1, you have to wait until turn 2 to evolve it into a Wartortle. If you do that, then you have to wait until turn 3 to evolve Wartortle into Blastoise.

Sometimes evolution causes special effects to happen, like evolution triggered Abilities. Those may or may not be mandatory, but can be used at this point.

Attach Energy

You are limited to 1 energy attachment per turn. Using cards and abilities can get around this, but you're allowed 1 direct attachment from your hand. It's important to try to attach energy every turn, as you're often going to need more energy no matter how good you're doing. However, there are cases where holding back may be better. Again, just because you can, doesn't mean you should. It's up to the situation as to what the best course of action.

Retreat

You can retreat during your turn if you pay the retreat cost. You may not retreat if you have no Pokemon on your bench.

Declare an Attack

This is the last part of a turn, and generally what ends it. When you declare an attack, you carry it out along with its effects, and your turn is over.

Passing

Sometimes you don't have an attack to use, or maybe you're stalling, or maybe attacking would actually make things worse for you at the moment. No matter what, you may end your turn by passing to the opponent.

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You have a lot of options when you're playing on what to do. Some have limitations which can make you think you need to hit their limit every turn to take advantage of them, but keep in mind, that's not the best strategy for all occasions.

In the next lesson, we'll talk about the battlefield and where everything belongs.

pop flyin' Gaming.

-Professor Kamak
Last edited by Kamak on Tue May 23, 2017 8:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
-K-
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[Citation Needed]
I'll cite your sources
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Re: Let's Discuss the Pokemon TCG with Prof. Kamak

Post by [Citation Needed] »

a friend of someone I randomly met in the hallway of my dorm mentioned the Pokemon TCG and I mentioned my big ol' bag of cards from the end of the 90s.

He said that those cards aren't allowed/used at all in modern play.


IS THIS TRUE
IF SO, WHO DO I HAVE TO KILL
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Lordy wrote:i also fear you
Rinoko wrote:You old saggy titted witch

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D-vid
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Re: Let's Discuss the Cockfighting Society TCG with Prof. Ka

Post by D-vid »

Well, compare
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this original Venusaur

to
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This Venusaur.

The original one is just about worse in every aspect except retreat costs.
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Kamak
Riku's other favorite
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Re: Let's Discuss the Cockfighting Society TCG with Prof. Ka

Post by Kamak »

They're allowed in in unmodified and variant set play, but not in modified which is what leagues and major tournaments play.

Those cards were retired from play shortly after Wizards lost the right to distribute overseas and when the game went through a bit of retooling, so it's not a surprise that they'd be booted.

In addition, they're generally horribly underpowered compared to more recent pokemon, though a few can be game breakers (like Mr. Mime).

Beyond those sets, every year or two, sets get retired from play in order to cycle out broken cards and refresh the metagame and make more cheddar.

The only ways you can play old cards is in unmodified format or if certain cards were reprinted (like Potion). Other than that, all official games are geared to the Black and White sets.
-K-
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